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But it turned out that in China, where relatively few people use email, almost everyone uses We Chat.

In a country of 710 million internet users, Tencent, the Shenzhen-based goliath that owns We Chat, reports that as of September, the app has 768 million active users—up 35 percent over the same period last year.

That was when I started to understand the competitive, gambling-like thrill of Red Packets.

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(Think the Super Bowl times seven.) Throughout the show, viewers were prompted to shake their phones for a chance to win a combined $80 million in red envelopes from corporate sponsors.

(We Chat has a “shake your phone” feature that’s normally used to connect strangers who are shaking their phones at the same time.) The company said that 20 million viewers shook their phones 11 billion times throughout the show.

Mike complained that the play’s producer had imposed a no-stickers rule on the production’s We Chat group, but people kept sending them anyway.

Up until then, I had thought of We Chat as a social messaging app, like Facebook crossed with Whats App.

And—here’s an “only in China” factoid—409,000 of them were sent in a single second, just after midnight on the first night of the holiday.

Tencent skipped the TV gala this past Chinese New Year but built up anticipation for the holiday with another shake stunt on the big screen in Times Square, and an eight-hour “lucky money” gimmick in January: Users could post a blurred-out photo on We Chat, and contacts could send them a red envelope in order to remove the blur.

To me it sounded bizarre, the equivalent of your boss tossing a fistful of change at your cubicle. A few days later, a Red Packet icon appeared in a chat stream I had going with friends back in China.

The producer would also send red envelopes as a reward to the cast and crew for their hard work. I tapped on it, and a full-screen message announced that I had received 0.03 yuan—a fraction of a cent.

The catch was that the platform would randomly determine the amount of money in the envelope.

Users posted some 29 million photos, and 192 million people paid to see them, according to Tencent.

But it also encourages users to send money to groups in randomized amounts. You can put in a red envelope and set it to disburse equally, so each friend gets

Tencent skipped the TV gala this past Chinese New Year but built up anticipation for the holiday with another shake stunt on the big screen in Times Square, and an eight-hour “lucky money” gimmick in January: Users could post a blurred-out photo on We Chat, and contacts could send them a red envelope in order to remove the blur.To me it sounded bizarre, the equivalent of your boss tossing a fistful of change at your cubicle. A few days later, a Red Packet icon appeared in a chat stream I had going with friends back in China.The producer would also send red envelopes as a reward to the cast and crew for their hard work. I tapped on it, and a full-screen message announced that I had received 0.03 yuan—a fraction of a cent.The catch was that the platform would randomly determine the amount of money in the envelope.Users posted some 29 million photos, and 192 million people paid to see them, according to Tencent.But it also encourages users to send money to groups in randomized amounts. You can put $5 in a red envelope and set it to disburse equally, so each friend gets $1.

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Tencent skipped the TV gala this past Chinese New Year but built up anticipation for the holiday with another shake stunt on the big screen in Times Square, and an eight-hour “lucky money” gimmick in January: Users could post a blurred-out photo on We Chat, and contacts could send them a red envelope in order to remove the blur.

To me it sounded bizarre, the equivalent of your boss tossing a fistful of change at your cubicle. A few days later, a Red Packet icon appeared in a chat stream I had going with friends back in China.

The producer would also send red envelopes as a reward to the cast and crew for their hard work. I tapped on it, and a full-screen message announced that I had received 0.03 yuan—a fraction of a cent.

The catch was that the platform would randomly determine the amount of money in the envelope.

Users posted some 29 million photos, and 192 million people paid to see them, according to Tencent.

But it also encourages users to send money to groups in randomized amounts. You can put $5 in a red envelope and set it to disburse equally, so each friend gets $1.

||

Tencent skipped the TV gala this past Chinese New Year but built up anticipation for the holiday with another shake stunt on the big screen in Times Square, and an eight-hour “lucky money” gimmick in January: Users could post a blurred-out photo on We Chat, and contacts could send them a red envelope in order to remove the blur.

To me it sounded bizarre, the equivalent of your boss tossing a fistful of change at your cubicle. A few days later, a Red Packet icon appeared in a chat stream I had going with friends back in China.

The producer would also send red envelopes as a reward to the cast and crew for their hard work. I tapped on it, and a full-screen message announced that I had received 0.03 yuan—a fraction of a cent.

The catch was that the platform would randomly determine the amount of money in the envelope.

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